Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Brockington Place Brockington Place is named after Sir William Allport Brockington who was Director of Education for Leicestershire between 1903 and 1947. Brockington was appointed in the wake of the 1902 Balfour education act which made the county council (which had only been set up in 1888) responsible for technical, secondary and elementary education throughout the county. Brockington served for an unprecedented length of time and ensured that the numerous changes took place in education were successfully implemented them during this period. What was also remarkable was that he neither went to a public school nor to Oxford or Cambridge but had been educated at King Edward’s School and Mason University College in Birmingham. In 1915, when he was 44 years old, he volunteered for military service but was refused on medical grounds. But he did join the Territorial Army and commanded the second voluntary brigade of the Leicester regiment and attained the rank of major. In 1917 he was awarded the OBE for his contribution to the war effort. Brockington also made an important contribution in starting courses for munition workers in Loughborough. In 1915 the governors of Loughborough technical Institute had appointed a new principal, Dr Herbert Schofield. In order to ensure that it had the facilities to carry out the training, Schofield, Brockington and Alderman Bumpus,* who was chairman of the governors at the time, personally guaranteed the sum of £1,000 to be spent on second-hand machinery to equip a new machine shop which opened in the spring of 1917. The 1918 education act raised the school leaving age to 14 but also said that no child should be debarred from an education by which she could profit by reason of his inability to pay fees. _____ * As the documentary on Herrick Road noted, Alderman Bumpus lived at No.1 at the end of the road.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Brockington Place Brockington Place is named after Sir William Allport Brockington who was Director of Education for Leicestershire between 1903 and 1947. Brockington was appointed in the wake of the 1902 Balfour education act which made the county council (which had only been set up in 1888) responsible for technical, secondary and elementary education throughout the county. Brockington served for an unprecedented length of time and ensured that the numerous changes took place in education were successfully implemented them during this period. What was also remarkable was that he neither went to a public school nor to Oxford or Cambridge but had been educated at King Edward’s School and Mason University College in Birmingham. In 1915, when he was 44 years old, he volunteered for military service but was refused on medical grounds. But he did join the Territorial Army and commanded the second voluntary brigade of the Leicester regiment and attained the rank of major. In 1917 he was awarded the OBE for his contribution to the war effort. Brockington also made an important contribution in starting courses for munition workers in Loughborough. In 1915 the governors of Loughborough technical Institute had appointed a new principal, Dr Herbert Schofield. In order to ensure that it had the facilities to carry out the training, Schofield, Brockington and Alderman Bumpus,* who was chairman of the governors at the time, personally guaranteed the sum of £1,000 to be spent on second-hand machinery to equip a new machine shop which opened in the spring of 1917. The 1918 education act raised the school leaving age to 14 but also said that no child should be debarred from an education by which she could profit by reason of his inability to pay fees. _____ * As the documentary on Herrick Road noted, Alderman Bumpus lived at No.1 at the end of the road.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.