Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Albert Street and Albert Place Albert Street and Albert Place were named after Prince Albert of Saxe- Coburg and Gotha (1819-1861) – the husband of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Albert was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld to a family connected to many of Europe’s ruling monarchs. At the age of 20 he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria, with whom he would ultimately have nine children. Albert’s new role was serving as prince consort of Great Britain and Ireland, which meant that he had married a sitting queen but had no real power of his own. But as he settled in to the role Albert adopted many public causes, such as educational reform and a worldwide abolition of slavery, and took on the responsibilities of running the Queen’s household, estates and office. In dispensing advice, Prince Albert encouraged Victoria to take a greater interest in social welfare issues, including child labor, and suggested she favor a stance of political neutrality (which she did, abandoning her Whig ties). Albert was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851. Albert aided in the development of Britain’s constitutional monarchy by persuading his wife to show less partisanship in her dealings with Parliament although he actively disagreed with the interventionist foreign policy pursued during Lord Palmerston’s tenure as Foreign Secretary. He died at the early age of 42 from typhoid fever, plunging the Queen into mourning that lasted for the rest of her life.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Albert Street and Albert Place Albert Street and Albert Place were named after Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (1819-1861) – the husband of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Albert was born in the Saxon duchy of Saxe-Coburg- Saalfeld to a family connected to many of Europe’s ruling monarchs. At the age of 20 he married his first cousin, Queen Victoria, with whom he would ultimately have nine children. Albert’s new role was serving as prince consort of Great Britain and Ireland, which meant that he had married a sitting queen but had no real power of his own. But as he settled in to the role Albert adopted many public causes, such as educational reform and a worldwide abolition of slavery, and took on the responsibilities of running the Queen’s household, estates and office. In dispensing advice, Prince Albert encouraged Victoria to take a greater interest in social welfare issues, including child labor, and suggested she favor a stance of political neutrality (which she did, abandoning her Whig ties). Albert was heavily involved with the organisation of the Great Exhibition of 1851. Albert aided in the development of Britain’s constitutional monarchy by persuading his wife to show less partisanship in her dealings with Parliament although he actively disagreed with the interventionist foreign policy pursued during Lord Palmerston’s tenure as Foreign Secretary. He died at the early age of 42 from typhoid fever, plunging the Queen into mourning that lasted for the rest of her life.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.