Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Beacon Road Beacon Road was named because it led towards Beacon Hill. Beacon Hill was the site of a Bronze Age hill fort believed to be up to 3,000 years old. Today a toposcope indicates landmarks which can be seen from the summit. These include Lincoln Cathedral and the hills of the Peak District. The Beacon is a 240 acre site of undulating heathland, woodland, grassland, wetlands, rocky outcrops and meadows. Rising to a height of 245m, Beacon Hill is the second highest point in Leicestershire and boasts spectacular views of Charnwood Forest and the Soar Valley. The Country Park supports an important range of plants and animals and is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The name Beacon Hill recalls the use of the hill as a signalling post although no trace now remains of the beacon. Beacons were fires lit at well-known locations on hills or high places, used either as lighthouses for navigation at sea, or for signalling over land that enemy troops were approaching, in order to alert defences. As signals, beacons are an ancient form of optical telegraphy, and were part of a relay league.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Beacon Road Beacon Road was named because it led towards Beacon Hill. Beacon Hill was the site of a Bronze Age hill fort believed to be up to 3,000 years old. Today a toposcope indicates landmarks which can be seen from the summit. These include Lincoln Cathedral and the hills of the Peak District. The Beacon is a 240 acre site of undulating heathland, woodland, grassland, wetlands, rocky outcrops and meadows. Rising to a height of 245m, Beacon Hill is the second highest point in Leicestershire and boasts spectacular views of Charnwood Forest and the Soar Valley. The Country Park supports an important range of plants and animals and is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. The name Beacon Hill recalls the use of the hill as a signalling post although no trace now remains of the beacon. Beacons were fires lit at well-known locations on hills or high places, used either as lighthouses for navigation at sea, or for signalling over land that enemy troops were approaching, in order to alert defences. As signals, beacons are an ancient form of optical telegraphy, and were part of a relay league.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.