Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
In choosing a candidate for the next General Election, Loughborough Labour Party appears to have gone for the safe option in selecting Nottingham barrister Stuart David Brady. Members of the Labour Party were given the choice of five candidates: the leader of the Labour Group on Charnwood Borough Council, Jewel Miah; local advice worker Alice Brennan; Grammar School old boy Sachin Patel; Leicester-based ‘Blairite’ Nathan Oswin; and Nottingham barrister Brady. In choosing Brady, Labour clearly appreciate that to pose any significant challenge to Nicky Morgan they need to win enough support from the villages as well as bolster their support on the predominantly white council estates in the town. Immediately before the meeting, Brady sent a ‘dear comrades’ message to his supporters which indicated that he was ideological onside and, perhaps unlike some of the other candidates, could be trusted to support Corbyn: “As the Labour Party, we must set out an alternative to austerity and neoliberalism.  And under Jeremy Corbyn we are doing just that: publicly owned regional investment banks that will invest in high-skilled, well-paid jobs, a reversal of austerity, significant social housing investment, more trade union rights, and proper funding of our NHS.” The decision was clearly a shock to Miah, a county councillor and leader of the Labour group on the borough council, who had been a candidate earlier in the year. Miah ran a competent campaign and succeeded increasing the Labour vote from 16,579 to 22,753 – a staggering 37% increase. And unlike Brady, he actually lives in the constituency and is well known amongst the town’s large Bangladeshi community. One activist remarked that many felt Miah had “squeezed as many votes out of Loughborough as he could” and that a “new face was needed”. Whoever was selected is going to face a difficult task in 2023. By then, Nicky Morgan will have been the sitting MP for 13 years and, through her commitment and hard work has built up a significant amount of local support. In 2017, her vote increased to 49.9% and 27,022 votes – up from 41.6% and 21,971 votes when she was first elected in 2010 and 37.1% and 17,102 votes when she stood unsuccessfully in 2005. The role of the minor parties obviously had some impact on these figures but, demographically, Loughborough is becoming a more Conservative seat and this is reflected in the support for the Tory candidates in both Southfields and Shelthorpe – both previously traditional Labour strongholds.
Labour plays safe with a white, middle-class, heterosexual male candidate
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
LABOUR PLAYS SAFE WITH A WHITE, MIDDLE-CLASS, HETEROSEXUAL MALE CANDIDATE
In choosing a candidate for the next General Election, Loughborough Labour Party appears to have gone for the safe option in selecting Nottingham barrister Stuart David Brady. Members of the Labour Party were given the choice of five candidates: the leader of the Labour Group on Charnwood Borough Council, Jewel Miah; local advice worker Alice Brennan; Grammar School old boy Sachin Patel; Leicester- based ‘Blairite’ Nathan Oswin; and Nottingham barrister Brady. In choosing Brady, Labour clearly appreciate that to pose any significant challenge to Nicky Morgan they need to win enough support from the villages as well as bolster their support on the predominantly white council estates in the town. Immediately before the meeting, Brady sent a ‘dear comrades’ message to his supporters which indicated that he was ideological onside and, perhaps unlike some of the other candidates, could be trusted to support Corbyn: “As the Labour Party, we must set out an alternative to austerity and neoliberalism.  And under Jeremy Corbyn we are doing just that: publicly owned regional investment banks that will invest in high-skilled, well-paid jobs, a reversal of austerity, significant social housing investment, more trade union rights, and proper funding of our NHS.” The decision was clearly a shock to Miah, a county councillor and leader of the Labour group on the borough council, who had been a candidate earlier in the year. Miah ran a competent campaign and succeeded increasing the Labour vote from 16,579 to 22,753 – a staggering 37% increase. And unlike Brady, he actually lives in the constituency and is well known amongst the town’s large Bangladeshi community. One activist remarked that many felt Miah had “squeezed as many votes out of Loughborough as he could” and that a “new face was needed”. Whoever was selected is going to face a difficult task in 2023. By then, Nicky Morgan will have been the sitting MP for 13 years and, through her commitment and hard work has built up a significant amount of local support. In 2017, her vote increased to 49.9% and 27,022 votes – up from 41.6% and 21,971 votes when she was first elected in 2010 and 37.1% and 17,102 votes when she stood unsuccessfully in 2005. The role of the minor parties obviously had some impact on these figures but, demographically, Loughborough is becoming a more Conservative seat and this is reflected in the support for the Tory candidates in both Southfields and Shelthorpe – both previously traditional Labour strongholds.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.