Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Stuart Brady: Labour’s near-invisible
candidate
On 3 February 2018, Loughborough Labour Party selected Nottingham barrister
Stuart Brady as its new prospective parliamentary candidate for the next general
election.
One of the reasons that Brady was chosen was because he promised an immediate
and highly ambitious programme of campaigning and he had explicitly stated that
“if selected, in the first 50 days” he would carry out five specific tasks:
“Conduct a ‘road-show’ across every town or village in the constituency, supported
by Facebook advertising, to allow voters to meet their Labour candidate. Ensure
that Labour’s East Midlands Conference with Jeremy Corbyn in Loughborough in
February is turned into a major local campaigning event. Book a series of high-
profile speakers to excite members and voters and turn every campaign session
into an event. Make a detailed, exciting, and innovative plan to ensure every
potential student voter for Labour is identified and registered in Loughborough.
Agree a detailed week-by-week campaign plan with the local Labour Party,
contingency plans for a snap election, and local campaign themes with each
Branch.”
Things started well and on 8 February Brady took part in a small protest in
Shelthorpe over the closure of the Children’s Centre and then appeared in
Loughborough marketplace and in Sileby two days later.
Brady then spoke at the East Midlands
Conference which was briefly attended by
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn although he
appeared to have failed to have got a
photograph standing next to his leader. The
impact of the conference was marred by a
decision by East Midlands Labour Party to
charge different entry fees depending on your
colour – white people were asked to pay £10
more. This idea was only abandoned after the Equality and Human Rights
Commission announced that it was probably illegal and it attracted significant
adverse national media coverage. Although the conference was reported on it
clearly failed to become a “major local campaigning event” as Brady had
anticipated.
Brady then popped up on 21 February with a letter in the Loughborough Echo in
response to an observation by Southfields local councillor Paul Mercer. He then had
meetings with Labour councillors at County Hall and on 24 February made an
appearance in Shepshed. On 5 March, he spoke at Rawlins and two days later
joined striking lecturers outside Loughborough University. On 10 March he was in
Ashby ward and on 17 and 18 March was in Hastings ward in Loughborough.
In order to meet his commitment of carrying out a roadshow “across every town or
village in the constituency” Brady had until 17 March to stage an event in Quorn,
Mountsorrel, Barrow, Wymeswold, Hoton, Cotes, Woodhouse Eaves, Old
Woodhouse, Walton on the Wolds, Woodthorpe, Burton on the Wolds and Prestwold.
Brady has also failed to carry out his pledge to organise a “series of high-profile
speakers to excite members and voters” in his first 50 days.
Before the 2015 General Election, the Labour Party made the mistake of picking a
candidate who lived outside the constituency – 15 miles away – in Melton. In 2017
they chose a candidate who lived in Loughborough and the Labour went up by
37%. This time, they have gone out even further out of the constituency , 20 miles
away, and even outside the county, to Radcliffe on Trent.
Some local Labour activist realised their error and there was an abortive attempt to
deselect Matthew O’Callaghan as their candidate before 2015. This time, quite
remarkably, instead of choosing a solid local candidate with a proven track record
of campaigning in the constituency, such as Loughborough University advice worker
Alice Brennan or the town’s McDonald’s manager Jewel Miah, they opted for an
outsider who has clearly failed to carry out his ambitious promises made in his
selection campaign. Labour activists might now be asking whether they have made
another bad choice and have saddled themselves with a candidate who may lack
the determination and commitment needeed to pose a challenge to Nicky Morgan.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Stuart Brady: Labour’s
near-invisible candidate
On 3 February 2018, Loughborough Labour Party
selected Nottingham barrister Stuart Brady as its
new prospective parliamentary candidate for the
next general election.
One of the reasons that Brady was chosen was
because he promised an immediate and highly
ambitious programme of campaigning and he had
explicitly stated that “if selected, in the first 50
days” he would carry out five specific tasks:
“Conduct a ‘road-show’ across every town or village
in the constituency, supported by Facebook
advertising, to allow voters to meet their Labour
candidate. Ensure that Labour’s East Midlands
Conference with Jeremy Corbyn in Loughborough in
February is turned into a major local campaigning
event. Book a series of high-profile speakers to
excite members and voters and turn every
campaign session into an event. Make a detailed,
exciting, and innovative plan to ensure every
potential student voter for Labour is identified and
registered in Loughborough. Agree a detailed week-
by-week campaign plan with the local Labour Party,
contingency plans for a snap election, and local
campaign themes with each Branch.”
Things started well and on 8 February Brady took
part in a small protest in Shelthorpe over the
closure of the Children’s Centre and then appeared
in Loughborough marketplace and in Sileby two
days later.
Brady then spoke at the East Midlands Conference
which was briefly attended by Labour leader Jeremy
Corbyn although he appeared to have failed to have
got a photograph standing next to his leader. The
impact of the conference was marred by a decision
by East Midlands Labour Party to charge different
entry fees depending on your colour – white people
were asked to pay £10 more. This idea was only
abandoned after the Equality and Human Rights
Commission announced that it was probably illegal
and it attracted significant adverse national media
coverage. Although the conference was reported on
it clearly failed to become a “major local
campaigning event” as Brady had anticipated.
Brady then popped up on 21 February with a letter
in the Loughborough Echo in response to an
observation by Southfields local councillor Paul
Mercer. He then had meetings with Labour
councillors at County Hall and on 24 February made
an appearance in Shepshed. On 5 March, he spoke
at Rawlins and two days later joined striking
lecturers outside Loughborough University. On 10
March he was in Ashby ward and on 17 and 18
March was in Hastings ward in Loughborough.
In order to meet his commitment of carrying out a
roadshow “across every town or village in the
constituency” Brady had until 17 March to stage an
event in Quorn, Mountsorrel, Barrow, Wymeswold,
Hoton, Cotes, Woodhouse Eaves, Old Woodhouse,
Walton on the Wolds, Woodthorpe, Burton on the
Wolds and Prestwold. Brady has also failed to carry
out his pledge to organise a “series of high-profile
speakers to excite members and voters” in his first
50 days.
Before the 2015 General Election, the Labour Party
made the mistake of picking a candidate who lived
outside the constituency – 15 miles away – in
Melton. In 2017 they chose a candidate who lived in
Loughborough and the Labour went up by 37%. This
time, they have gone out even further out of the
constituency , 20 miles away, and even outside the
county, to Radcliffe on Trent.
Some local Labour activist realised their error and
there was an abortive attempt to deselect Matthew
O’Callaghan as their candidate before 2015. This
time, quite remarkably, instead of choosing a solid
local candidate with a proven track record of
campaigning in the constituency, such as
Loughborough University advice worker Alice
Brennan or the town’s McDonald’s manager Jewel
Miah, they opted for an outsider who has clearly
failed to carry out his ambitious promises made in
his selection campaign. Labour activists might now
be asking whether they have made another bad
choice and have saddled themselves with a
candidate who may lack the determination and
commitment needeed to pose a challenge to Nicky
Morgan.