Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Broad Street The houses, shops and factories on Broad Street were built in the 1880s and one of the most significant was the Hanford & Miller hosiery factory which appeared in 1883 located on what is now the Sainsbury’s car park. On the north side – now Regent Place retail Park – was the Midland Brewery. The brewery backs onto Regent Street which had been named after Regent Cottage on the Derby Road. Behind that was the Loughborough Union Workhouse. Brothers William and Francis Harley began brewing on Derby Road in 1791. In 1855, George Redrup was the brewer at Harley’s, and by 1863 the company was listed as ‘G. & J. A. Redrup’. In 1865 this was registered as the Midland Brewery Co (MBC). It had a store on Humberstone Gate and Clarence Street in Leicester (see picture). Redrup continued as brewer until 1876 when George Trease took over. In 1896 MBC took over Thomas Nuttall’s North Leicestershire Brewery Co. at Beeby. 1902 saw the sell off of 23 licensed houses and 11 off-licences to Strettons and although the registered office became the Wardwick Brewery at Derby, the Midland continued in its own right. In 1927 Allsop’s’ bought Strettons, closing the Derby brewery but keeping the Midland site open, only to be finally closed in 1932. 2 Broad Street Herbert And grave, who served with the 1st North Midland Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, who died from tuberculosis in March 1916, lived at 2 Broad Street. Herbert Angrave was born in Loughborough in 1894, the son of Eli Angrave and Fanny Lawrence Antill who were married in Loughborough on 6 February 1892. Herbert’s father was an elastic factory mechanic. Herbert’s mother died, aged 29, on 25th October 1898 and in 1901 Herbert and his brothers together with their widowed father were living at 2 Broad Street, Loughborough with their widowed grandfather Eli Angrave, a maltster, and their maiden aunts Annie, Mary and Fanny. Herbert had a position as an ironmonger’s apprentice with Messrs. Morgan & Green of Baxter Gate. Herbert enlisted at Boston, Lincolnshire, on 5 September 1914. At the time he was working as an ironmonger for R. J. Harwood of Boston and living at 43 Red Lion Street, Boston. He was posted to the 1st Lincolnshire Battery of the 1st North Midland Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery as Gunner 1397. He was initially posted to Luton for training. King George V inspected the troops on 9 February 1915 and Herbert arrived in Boulogne on 6 March 1915. A few days later he was reprimanded for being absent from his billet without leave. His first months abroad were spent in the Ypres Salient. Herbert was at Hooge in late July when the German liquid fire attack took place and also in the attack at the Hohenzollern Redoubt on 13 October 1915. On 25 February 1916 Herbert was admitted to the 2nd North Midlands Field Ambulance with tubercular peritonitis. The following day he was transferred to 30 Casualty Clearing Station and then to No. 2 General Hospital at Le Havre. The hospital ship St. Denis transferred him to the Royal Victoria Military Hospital at Netley, Hampshire on 2 March 1916. Herbert died there on 17 March 1916, aged 22. Herbert’s funeral took place at Loughborough Cemetery on Tuesday 22 March 1916. Mr. T. Hills of Quorn conducted the ceremony, the coffin bearers were from Glen Parva Depot, and a bugler sounded the Last Post. Herbert is buried in Grave 15-134 at Loughborough Cemetery. Herbert’s brothers also served in the war, Harry with the Army Veterinary Corps and the Royal Fusiliers and Wilfred as a Gunner with the Royal Field Artillery. Unlike Herbert they both survived. 12 Broad Street Albert Beadman who was killed in action, aged 26, on 29 April 1917 while serving with 7th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, lived at 12 Broad Street. Albert William Beadman was born in Loughborough in 1890 and baptised on 21 October 1891 at All Saints' Church, Loughborough. He was the only surviving son of William Finney Beadman, a bricklayer, and his wife Alice Ensor Beadman (née Frake) who were married at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, on 25 October 1885. Albert had three sisters Helen, Annie and Alice; two brothers Herbert and Frank had died in infancy. In 1890 the family lived at 50 Ashby Square, Loughborough. They later moved to 69 Station Street and then to 12 Broad Street. In 1911 Albert was a bricklayer's labourer and on 30 May 1914 he married Louisa Dorothy Wheldon at Holy Trinity Church, Loughborough. After they were married Albert and Louisa lived at 46 The Banks, Sileby, and Albert worked as a shoehand. Albert enlisted on 8 December 1915 and joined the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 27282. He was assigned to the Army Reserve and posted to the 8th (Service) Battalion on 4 April 1916. He embarked at Folkestone for France on 27 July 1916 and reached Etaples on the following day. At Calais on 23rd August he was posted to the 7th Battalion and two days later joined the 7th Leicesters in the trenches at Agnez-lès-Duisans, near Arras. After ten days training at Denier and Sars-le-Bois the battalion entrained for the Somme on 12 September and bivouacked outside Montauban north-east of Bernafay Wood. On 25 September they fought very bravely and successfully at Gueudecourt in an action which was part of the Battle of Morval. On 4th October the battalion entrained once more for the north and the countryside of Loos, taking over positions opposite the Hohenzollern Redoubt with rest billets at Mazingarbe, Philosophe, or Vermelles. Training at Cauchy-à-la-Tour and Houtkerque followed. On 29 March the battalion entrained at Noyelles for Saulty-Larbret and marched to La Cauchie and on to Moyenneville. On 4 April the battalion went into the front line at St. Leger Croisilles, with breaks at Moyenneville. On 15-23 April the battalion was in training at Bailleulval before returning to the trenches at St. Leger Croisilles. Albert was killed in action on 29 April 1917, the second day of the Battle of Arleux. He was 26. Albert's wife received a letter from the Lieutenant of Albert's Company which read: “I regret to inform you that your husband Private A. W. Beadman was killed on the 29th of last month. I buried him in a cemetery nearby and marked his grave with a cross, with all particulars on. A dozen men and I myself were within ten yards of him when a shell dropped behind him, and wounded two others also. Death was instantaneous. He was a good man, and I was very sorry to lose him. And I hope you will please excuse the delay of writing, and accept my deepest sympathy in your sad loss”. Albert is commemorated on the Arras Memorial Bay 5, on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, and on the Carillon. Alice is the was married again in Loughborough in 1920 to William S. Gillingham. She died in Leicester in June 1957 aged 64. 24 Broad Street Alfred George Aldridge, who served with the 1/1st Leicestershire Yeomanry and who was killed in action on 7 February 1915, aged 20, lived at 24 Broad Street..                                    Alfred was the only son of George and Emma Louisa Aldridge. He had three sisters Florence, Hilda and Ethel and prior to the war Alfred was employed at the Empress Works. The 1/1st Leicestershire Yeomanry was mobilised on 5 August 1914 and billeted in the village of Palgrave, Suffolk, until 1 November 1914. The unit then went by train to Southampton with the horses, landed at Le Havre on 2 November and marched for two days up to Ypres. The 1/1st took part in the First Battle of Ypres and were in reserve to some other units. It was  sent to the trenches several times, being transported there in buses and leaving the horses back at the billets. After the battle the unit were billeted for one night just outside the moat at Ypres where they were badly shelled and lost a lot of horses. From there it marched back again to billets in different farmhouses and farm buildings around Hazebrouck. Alfred Aldridge was shot through the heart by a German sniper early on Sunday morning of 7 February 1915, while digging trenches at Zillebeke, near Ypres. Alfred is commemorated on the memorial in Loughborough Parish Church.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Broad Street The houses, shops and factories on Broad Street were built in the 1880s and one of the most significant was the Hanford & Miller hosiery factory which appeared in 1883 located on what is now the Sainsbury’s car park. On the north side – now Regent Place retail Park – was the Midland Brewery. The brewery backs onto Regent Street which had been named after Regent Cottage on the Derby Road. Behind that was the Loughborough Union Workhouse. Brothers William and Francis Harley began brewing on Derby Road in 1791. In 1855, George Redrup was the brewer at Harley’s, and by 1863 the company was listed as ‘G. & J. A. Redrup’. In 1865 this was registered as the Midland Brewery Co (MBC). It had a store on Humberstone Gate and Clarence Street in Leicester (see picture). Redrup continued as brewer until 1876 when George Trease took over. In 1896 MBC took over Thomas Nuttall’s North Leicestershire Brewery Co. at Beeby. 1902 saw the sell off of 23 licensed houses and 11 off- licences to Strettons and although the registered office became the Wardwick Brewery at Derby, the Midland continued in its own right. In 1927 Allsop’s’ bought Strettons, closing the Derby brewery but keeping the Midland site open, only to be finally closed in 1932. 2 Broad Street Herbert And grave, who served with the 1st North Midland Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, who died from tuberculosis in March 1916, lived at 2 Broad Street. Herbert Angrave was born in Loughborough in 1894, the son of Eli Angrave and Fanny Lawrence Antill who were married in Loughborough on 6 February 1892. Herbert’s father was an elastic factory mechanic. Herbert’s mother died, aged 29, on 25th October 1898 and in 1901 Herbert and his brothers together with their widowed father were living at 2 Broad Street, Loughborough with their widowed grandfather Eli Angrave, a maltster, and their maiden aunts Annie, Mary and Fanny. Herbert had a position as an ironmonger’s apprentice with Messrs. Morgan & Green of Baxter Gate. Herbert enlisted at Boston, Lincolnshire, on 5 September 1914. At the time he was working as an ironmonger for R. J. Harwood of Boston and living at 43 Red Lion Street, Boston. He was posted to the 1st Lincolnshire Battery of the 1st North Midland Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery as Gunner 1397. He was initially posted to Luton for training. King George V inspected the troops on 9 February 1915 and Herbert arrived in Boulogne on 6 March 1915. A few days later he was reprimanded for being absent from his billet without leave. His first months abroad were spent in the Ypres Salient. Herbert was at Hooge in late July when the German liquid fire attack took place and also in the attack at the Hohenzollern Redoubt on 13 October 1915. On 25 February 1916 Herbert was admitted to the 2nd North Midlands Field Ambulance with tubercular peritonitis. The following day he was transferred to 30 Casualty Clearing Station and then to No. 2 General Hospital at Le Havre. The hospital ship St. Denis transferred him to the Royal Victoria Military Hospital at Netley, Hampshire on 2 March 1916. Herbert died there on 17 March 1916, aged 22. Herbert’s funeral took place at Loughborough Cemetery on Tuesday 22 March 1916. Mr. T. Hills of Quorn conducted the ceremony, the coffin bearers were from Glen Parva Depot, and a bugler sounded the Last Post. Herbert is buried in Grave 15-134 at Loughborough Cemetery. Herbert’s brothers also served in the war, Harry with the Army Veterinary Corps and the Royal Fusiliers and Wilfred as a Gunner with the Royal Field Artillery. Unlike Herbert they both survived. 12 Broad Street Albert Beadman who was killed in action, aged 26, on 29 April 1917 while serving with 7th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, lived at 12 Broad Street. Albert William Beadman was born in Loughborough in 1890 and baptised on 21 October 1891 at All Saints' Church, Loughborough. He was the only surviving son of William Finney Beadman, a bricklayer, and his wife Alice Ensor Beadman (née Frake) who were married at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, on 25 October 1885. Albert had three sisters Helen, Annie and Alice; two brothers Herbert and Frank had died in infancy. In 1890 the family lived at 50 Ashby Square, Loughborough. They later moved to 69 Station Street and then to 12 Broad Street. In 1911 Albert was a bricklayer's labourer and on 30 May 1914 he married Louisa Dorothy Wheldon at Holy Trinity Church, Loughborough. After they were married Albert and Louisa lived at 46 The Banks, Sileby, and Albert worked as a shoehand. Albert enlisted on 8 December 1915 and joined the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 27282. He was assigned to the Army Reserve and posted to the 8th (Service) Battalion on 4 April 1916. He embarked at Folkestone for France on 27 July 1916 and reached Etaples on the following day. At Calais on 23rd August he was posted to the 7th Battalion and two days later joined the 7th Leicesters in the trenches at Agnez-lès-Duisans, near Arras. After ten days training at Denier and Sars-le-Bois the battalion entrained for the Somme on 12 September and bivouacked outside Montauban north-east of Bernafay Wood. On 25 September they fought very bravely and successfully at Gueudecourt in an action which was part of the Battle of Morval. On 4th October the battalion entrained once more for the north and the countryside of Loos, taking over positions opposite the Hohenzollern Redoubt with rest billets at Mazingarbe, Philosophe, or Vermelles. Training at Cauchy-à-la-Tour and Houtkerque followed. On 29 March the battalion entrained at Noyelles for Saulty- Larbret and marched to La Cauchie and on to Moyenneville. On 4 April the battalion went into the front line at St. Leger Croisilles, with breaks at Moyenneville. On 15-23 April the battalion was in training at Bailleulval before returning to the trenches at St. Leger Croisilles. Albert was killed in action on 29 April 1917, the second day of the Battle of Arleux. He was 26. Albert's wife received a letter from the Lieutenant of Albert's Company which read: “I regret to inform you that your husband Private A. W. Beadman was killed on the 29th of last month. I buried him in a cemetery nearby and marked his grave with a cross, with all particulars on. A dozen men and I myself were within ten yards of him when a shell dropped behind him, and wounded two others also. Death was instantaneous. He was a good man, and I was very sorry to lose him. And I hope you will please excuse the delay of writing, and accept my deepest sympathy in your sad loss”. Albert is commemorated on the Arras Memorial Bay 5, on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, and on the Carillon. Alice is the was married again in Loughborough in 1920 to William S. Gillingham. She died in Leicester in June 1957 aged 64. 24 Broad Street Alfred George Aldridge, who served with the 1/1st Leicestershire Yeomanry and who was killed in action on 7 February 1915, aged 20, lived at 24 Broad Street..                                    Alfred was the only son of  George and Emma Louisa Aldridge. He had three sisters Florence, Hilda and Ethel and prior to the war Alfred was employed at the Empress Works. The 1/1st Leicestershire Yeomanry was mobilised on 5 August 1914 and billeted in the village of Palgrave, Suffolk, until 1 November 1914. The unit then went by train to Southampton with the horses, landed at Le Havre on 2 November and marched for two days up to Ypres. The 1/1st took part in the First Battle of Ypres and were in reserve to some other units. It was  sent to the trenches several times, being transported there in buses and leaving the horses back at the billets. After the battle the unit were billeted for one night just outside the moat at Ypres where they were badly shelled and lost a lot of horses. From there it marched back again to billets in different farmhouses and farm buildings around Hazebrouck. Alfred Aldridge was shot through the heart by a German sniper early on Sunday morning of 7 February 1915, while digging trenches at Zillebeke, near Ypres. Alfred is commemorated on the memorial in Loughborough Parish Church.
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