Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Burton Street Burton Street was named afterThomas Burton who was an English wool merchant who worked for the Company of the Staple at Calais. He willed money for priests to pray for his soul upon his death in 1495; these priests went on to found the boys school that would become Loughborough Grammar School. The will (translated from Latin) read: Thomas Burton of Loughborough Will dated 12 June 1494. Latin. Probate 1498 Soul to almighty God, Blessed Virgin Mary, and all the saints Burial: in the parish church To the high altar of L for tithes forgotten: 40s To the high altar of Lincoln: 3s 4d To the fabric of Lincoln: 3s 4d To the gilds of Corpus Christi, Weavers, Carpenters, and the King’s Gild 20s equally between them To the bridges and common ways in the parish of L 20s, but more if necessary at the discretion of his execs To Garendon Abbey: 20s To Ulverscroft Priory: 20s To Gracedieu Priory: 20s To Langley Priory: 20s Wife, Emmot, and sons, Edward and Christopher, residuary legatees and execs Witnesses: Mr John Fyscher, rector of L, and Richard Cauell, notary public   After Calais was conquered in 1347 by the English, Calais was the staple from 1363, after that right had been assigned in turns to Bruges and Antwerp in the first half of the 14th century. A group of 26 traders was incorporated as the Company of the Staple at Calais. In exchange for its cooperation in the payment of taxes, the company was granted a total monopoly on wool exports from England. The company was important to the English crown, both as a source of revenue, and through its role in the defence of Calais against the French. As domestic cloth production increased, raw wool exports were less important, diminishing the power of the Merchants. In 1558, with the loss of Calais to the French, the staple was transferred to Bruges where the Merchant Staplers continued to enjoy their monopoly on exports. However, in 1614, export of raw wool was banned entirely during the Cockayne Project of William Cockayne and wool was traded only in domestic staples. The project failed however, because the States-General of the Netherlands banned the import of cloth from England. In 1617 the English lifted their ban, but the Dutch ban remained in place. The Merchant Staplers continued to exist, but only in local markets.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Burton Street Burton Street was named afterThomas Burton who was an English wool merchant who worked for the Company of the Staple at Calais. He willed money for priests to pray for his soul upon his death in 1495; these priests went on to found the boys school that would become Loughborough Grammar School. The will (translated from Latin) read: Thomas Burton of Loughborough Will dated 12 June 1494. Latin. Probate 1498 Soul to almighty God, Blessed Virgin Mary, and all the saints Burial: in the parish church To the high altar of L for tithes forgotten: 40s To the high altar of Lincoln: 3s 4d To the fabric of Lincoln: 3s 4d To the gilds of Corpus Christi, Weavers, Carpenters, and the King’s Gild 20s equally between them To the bridges and common ways in the parish of L 20s, but more if necessary at the discretion of his execs To Garendon Abbey: 20s To Ulverscroft Priory: 20s To Gracedieu Priory: 20s To Langley Priory: 20s Wife, Emmot, and sons, Edward and Christopher, residuary legatees and execs Witnesses: Mr John Fyscher, rector of L, and Richard Cauell, notary public   After Calais was conquered in 1347 by the English, Calais was the staple from 1363, after that right had been assigned in turns to Bruges and Antwerp in the first half of the 14th century. A group of 26 traders was incorporated as the Company of the Staple at Calais. In exchange for its cooperation in the payment of taxes, the company was granted a total monopoly on wool exports from England. The company was important to the English crown, both as a source of revenue, and through its role in the defence of Calais against the French. As domestic cloth production increased, raw wool exports were less important, diminishing the power of the Merchants. In 1558, with the loss of Calais to the French, the staple was transferred to Bruges where the Merchant Staplers continued to enjoy their monopoly on exports. However, in 1614, export of raw wool was banned entirely during the Cockayne Project of William Cockayne and wool was traded only in domestic staples. The project failed however, because the States-General of the Netherlands banned the import of cloth from England. In 1617 the English lifted their ban, but the Dutch ban remained in place. The Merchant Staplers continued to exist, but only in local markets.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.