Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Carillon The Carillon is a carillon and war memorial in Queen’s Park, and is a well-known landmark, visible from several miles away. It is 152 feet high. Plans were finalised in 1919 and when completed in 1923 it was the first grand carillon in England, the concept being associated with Belgium where so many British servicemen lost their lives during the 1914–1918 Great War. The Carillon was designed by Sir Walter Tapper, and is now grade II listed The carillon has 47 bells, all of which were cast at John Taylor Bell Foundry in Loughborough. The carillon was built by William Moss and Sons Ltd of Loughborough. The dedication was held on Sunday 22 July 1923, led by Bishop of Peterborough, Frank Theodore Woods and Field Marshal Sir William Robertson. Elgar composed Carillon Chimes for the occasion; the manuscript, donated to Charnwood Borough Council in the 1950s, was rediscovered in 2012. The tower is also home to a museum, three rooms packed with military memorabilia. Including one room dedicated to the Leicestershire Yeomanry. Climb the 138 steps, past the 47 bells and you are out onto the balcony with fantastic views across Loughborough.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Carillon The Carillon is a carillon and war memorial in Queen’s Park, and is a well-known landmark, visible from several miles away. It is 152 feet high. Plans were finalised in 1919 and when completed in 1923 it was the first grand carillon in England, the concept being associated with Belgium where so many British servicemen lost their lives during the 1914–1918 Great War. The Carillon was designed by Sir Walter Tapper, and is now grade II listed The carillon has 47 bells, all of which were cast at John Taylor Bell Foundry in Loughborough. The carillon was built by William Moss and Sons Ltd of Loughborough. The dedication was held on Sunday 22 July 1923, led by Bishop of Peterborough, Frank Theodore Woods and Field Marshal Sir William Robertson. Elgar composed Carillon Chimes for the occasion; the manuscript, donated to Charnwood Borough Council in the 1950s, was rediscovered in 2012. The tower is also home to a museum, three rooms packed with military memorabilia. Including one room dedicated to the Leicestershire Yeomanry. Climb the 138 steps, past the 47 bells and you are out onto the balcony with fantastic views across Loughborough.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.