Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Curzon Street Curzon Street was named after Lord Curzon. George Nathaniel Curzon (1859-1925) was a British Conservative statesman who was the Viceroy of India and the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. Curzon played a key role in instituting the 1905 Partition of Bengal, which led to a major political crisis for the British Empire. He drew the Curzon Line in Eastern Europe. He became Assistant Private Secretary to Lord Salisbury in 1885, and in 1886 entered Parliament as Member for Southport in south-west Lancashire. Curzon travelled around the world: Russia and Central Asia (1888–89), a long tour of Persia (1889-90), Siam, French Indochina and Korea (1892), and a foray into Afghanistan and the Pamirs (1894), and published several books describing central and eastern Asia and related policy issues. In January 1899 he was appointed Viceroy of India. He was created a Peer of Ireland as Baron Curzon of Kedleston, in the County of Derby, on his appointment. This peerage was created in the Peerage of Ireland (the last so created) so that he would be free, until his father’s death, to re-enter the House of Commons on his return to Britain. Reaching India shortly after the suppression of the frontier risings of 1897-98, he paid special attention to the independent tribes of the north-west frontier, inaugurated a new province called the North West Frontier Province, and pursued a policy of forceful control mingled with conciliation. The only major armed outbreak on this frontier during the period of his administration was the Mahsud-Waziri campaign of 1901. During his tenure, Curzon undertook the restoration of the Taj Mahal. Within India, Curzon appointed a number of commissions to inquire into education, irrigation, police and other branches of administration, on whose reports legislation was based during his second term of office as viceroy. Reappointed Governor-General in August 1904, he presided over the 1905 partition of Bengal, which roused such bitter opposition among the people of the province that it was later revoked. Curzon remained Foreign Secretary under Baldwin until the government fell in January 1924. When Baldwin formed a new government in November 1924 he appointed Curzon Lord President of the Council. Curzon held this post until the following March. In March 1925 he suffered a severe haemorrhage of the bladder. Surgery was unsuccessful and he died in London on 20 March 1925 at the age of 66.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Curzon Street Curzon Street was named after Lord Curzon. George Nathaniel Curzon (1859-1925) was a British Conservative statesman who was the Viceroy of India and the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. Curzon played a key role in instituting the 1905 Partition of Bengal, which led to a major political crisis for the British Empire. He drew the Curzon Line in Eastern Europe. He became Assistant Private Secretary to Lord Salisbury in 1885, and in 1886 entered Parliament as Member for Southport in south-west Lancashire. Curzon travelled around the world: Russia and Central Asia (1888–89), a long tour of Persia (1889- 90), Siam, French Indochina and Korea (1892), and a foray into Afghanistan and the Pamirs (1894), and published several books describing central and eastern Asia and related policy issues. In January 1899 he was appointed Viceroy of India. He was created a Peer of Ireland as Baron Curzon of Kedleston, in the County of Derby, on his appointment. This peerage was created in the Peerage of Ireland (the last so created) so that he would be free, until his father’s death, to re-enter the House of Commons on his return to Britain. Reaching India shortly after the suppression of the frontier risings of 1897-98, he paid special attention to the independent tribes of the north-west frontier, inaugurated a new province called the North West Frontier Province, and pursued a policy of forceful control mingled with conciliation. The only major armed outbreak on this frontier during the period of his administration was the Mahsud-Waziri campaign of 1901. During his tenure, Curzon undertook the restoration of the Taj Mahal. Within India, Curzon appointed a number of commissions to inquire into education, irrigation, police and other branches of administration, on whose reports legislation was based during his second term of office as viceroy. Reappointed Governor-General in August 1904, he presided over the 1905 partition of Bengal, which roused such bitter opposition among the people of the province that it was later revoked. Curzon remained Foreign Secretary under Baldwin until the government fell in January 1924. When Baldwin formed a new government in November 1924 he appointed Curzon Lord President of the Council. Curzon held this post until the following March. In March 1925 he suffered a severe haemorrhage of the bladder. Surgery was unsuccessful and he died in London on 20 March 1925 at the age of 66.
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