Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Fearon Fountain The Fearon Fountain was presented to Loughborough by Henry Fearon, Archdeacon of Leicester, in 1870 two marked the provision of the first public water supply in the town. The fountain was renovated in 1991 as part of the marketplace enhancement. The fountain is a Great II listed building. It is described as: Drinking fountain, dated 1870 above north arch, restored 1981. Ashlar, with polished Aberdeen granite columns, and late C19 cast iron lamp above. Square based canopied structure on a rustic basement (raised on plain plinth dated 1981), carried on squat columns with stylised foliage capitals, with cusped, round headed arches, bracketed cornice, traceried gables (north one carries shield of arms) and polished marble basins to north and south. Lion’s heads to east and west. Inscribed: Our common mercies/loudly call/for praise to God/who gave them all?. Metal plaque to west records: The Fearon Fountain presented to the town by Archdeacon Fearon to mark the provision of Loughborough’s first public water supply in 1870. Renovated as part of the Market Place enhancement 1981 Henry Fearon was a Rector of All Saints Parish Church, Loughborough from 1848 until his death in 1885. Fearon was an inspirational Victorian rector who spoke out against poverty, disease and poor education and promoted his faith passionately. Fearon was born in Cuckfield, Sussex, on 8 September 1802, and his parents were Joseph Francis and Jane Fearon. In 1851, Fearon was living at the Rectory as Rector of All Saints. Also living in the house was a footman/groom, a Cork and a housemaid. His niece, Mary T Erle (24) was staying as a visitor. In 1861, Fearon was living in the Rectory (at Rectory Place) in Loughborough with his sister Sarah Fearon (65) and his nephew Frances Fearon (23) was working as an articled clerk to a solicitor. They have for servants. In 1871, Fearon was living on his own in the Rectory with have made and a servant. He died on 12 June 1885 and left £11,341, 5s. 7d. In his will – worth about £1.4 million in 2018.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Fearon Fountain The Fearon Fountain was presented to Loughborough by Henry Fearon, Archdeacon of Leicester, in 1870 two marked the provision of the first public water supply in the town. The fountain was renovated in 1991 as part of the marketplace enhancement. The fountain is a Great II listed building. It is described as: Drinking fountain, dated 1870 above north arch, restored 1981. Ashlar, with polished Aberdeen granite columns, and late C19 cast iron lamp above. Square based canopied structure on a rustic basement (raised on plain plinth dated 1981), carried on squat columns with stylised foliage capitals, with cusped, round headed arches, bracketed cornice, traceried gables (north one carries shield of arms) and polished marble basins to north and south. Lion’s heads to east and west. Inscribed: Our common mercies/loudly call/for praise to God/who gave them all?. Metal plaque to west records: The Fearon Fountain presented to the town by Archdeacon Fearon to mark the provision of Loughborough’s first public water supply in 1870. Renovated as part of the Market Place enhancement 1981 Henry Fearon was a Rector of All Saints Parish Church, Loughborough from 1848 until his death in 1885. Fearon was an inspirational Victorian rector who spoke out against poverty, disease and poor education and promoted his faith passionately. Fearon was born in Cuckfield, Sussex, on 8 September 1802, and his parents were Joseph Francis and Jane Fearon. In 1851, Fearon was living at the Rectory as Rector of All Saints. Also living in the house was a footman/groom, a Cork and a housemaid. His niece, Mary T Erle (24) was staying as a visitor. In 1861, Fearon was living in the Rectory (at Rectory Place) in Loughborough with his sister Sarah Fearon (65) and his nephew Frances Fearon (23) was working as an articled clerk to a solicitor. They have for servants. In 1871, Fearon was living on his own in the Rectory with have made and a servant. He died on 12 June 1885 and left £11,341, 5s. 7d. In his will – worth about £1.4 million in 2018.