Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Gould gets in a muddle over council policies In his latest attempt to criticise Charnwood Borough Council, the Labour candidate for Southfields, Arthur Gould (79), has mistakenly claimed that the council is “considering” Labour Party policy “of employing workers directly to build and maintain council houses”. “Gould is wrong”, commented local Southfields councillor Paul Mercer, who is also the Cabinet Lead Member for Housing. “When he first made this claim on Facebook I sent him an email pointing out that he was mistaken and asking where he obtained this inaccurate information. I did not receive a reply. He subsequently repeated the claim in the Loughborough Echo”. “It is also unclear what he means by the ‘fear of privately contracted companies to do the job properly – usually at great expense to the council’s coffers and the the [sic] council taxpayer’,” added Paul. “Again, he has failed to substantiate this allegation”. The simple facts are: Charnwood is looking at the possibility of using land that it owns to build affordable housing which could either be rented out or purchased. Charnwood is constantly engaged in buying additional properties for use as social housing. The amount of social housing in the Charnwood is now at an all-time high with 8,482 units – up from 7,534 in 2012 – provided by the Council and registered providers (formerly known as housing associations). The Labour Party locally does not appear to have outlined any policies on housing and the stance it has taken at council meetings, and on the Housing Management Advisory Board (HMAB), are broadly in line with those of the controlling Conservative group. Charnwood is currently involved in a major programme to improve the condition of the houses and flats that it owns and to bring them up to a far higher ‘decent homes standard’ than is required by the law. This involves using major contractors who subcontract the work. Their problem, like anyone who has tried to find a local plumber, is that skilled workers are in short supply simply because they can earn so much more money working in London. “If Labour is intent on embarking on a new programme of council house building then it really needs to explain where the money and land is going to come from”, commented Paul. “Even if it could find the land, the cost of building an extra 500 homes would be approximately £75 million – effectively doubling the debt in the HRA – and putting a massive burden on the council tax payer. Likewise, it is easy to criticise the use of outside contractors but recruiting and setting up a new direct labour organisation would be a phenomenally expensive exercise and ultimately residents would suffer with massively increased council tax bills.” ,
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Gould gets in a muddle over council policies In his latest attempt to criticise Charnwood Borough Council, the Labour candidate for Southfields, Arthur Gould (79), has mistakenly claimed that the council is “considering” Labour Party policy “of employing workers directly to build and maintain council houses”. “Gould is wrong”, commented local Southfields councillor Paul Mercer, who is also the Cabinet Lead Member for Housing. “When he first made this claim on Facebook I sent him an email pointing out that he was mistaken and asking where he obtained this inaccurate information. I did not receive a reply. He subsequently repeated the claim in the Loughborough Echo”. “It is also unclear what he means by the ‘fear of privately contracted companies to do the job properly – usually at great expense to the council’s coffers and the the [sic] council taxpayer’,” added Paul. “Again, he has failed to substantiate this allegation”. The simple facts are: Charnwood is looking at the possibility of using land that it owns to build affordable housing which could either be rented out or purchased. Charnwood is constantly engaged in buying additional properties for use as social housing. The amount of social housing in the Charnwood is now at an all-time high with 8,482 units – up from 7,534 in 2012 – provided by the Council and registered providers (formerly known as housing associations). The Labour Party locally does not appear to have outlined any policies on housing and the stance it has taken at council meetings, and on the Housing Management Advisory Board (HMAB), are broadly in line with those of the controlling Conservative group. Charnwood is currently involved in a major programme to improve the condition of the houses and flats that it owns and to bring them up to a far higher ‘decent homes standard’ than is required by the law. This involves using major contractors who subcontract the work. Their problem, like anyone who has tried to find a local plumber, is that skilled workers are in short supply simply because they can earn so much more money working in London. “If Labour is intent on embarking on a new programme of council house building then it really needs to explain where the money and land is going to come from”, commented Paul. “Even if it could find the land, the cost of building an extra 500 homes would be approximately £75 million – effectively doubling the debt in the HRA – and putting a massive burden on the council tax payer. Likewise, it is easy to criticise the use of outside contractors but recruiting and setting up a new direct labour organisation would be a phenomenally expensive exercise and ultimately residents would suffer with massively increased council tax bills.” ,