Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Granby Street Granby Street was named after the Marquess of Granby. In 1703, the ninth Earl of Rutland was created Duke of Rutland and Marquess of Granby by Queen Anne. The most memorable Marquess of Granby was John Manners (1721–1770) who was the son of the third Duke. He was accomplished soldier and popular figure of his time. As with a number of prominent military leaders his title was honoured by being used by a large number of pubs throughout Britain. The towns of Granby, Quebec and Granby, Massachusetts, United States were also named after him. Lieutenant-General John Manners he did not outlive his father and was known by his father's subsidiary title, Marquess of Granby. He served in the Seven Years' War as overall commander of the British troops on the battlefield and was subsequently rewarded with the post of Commander-in-Chief of the Forces. He was returned as Member of Parliament for the family borough of Grantham in 1741. In 1745 he received a commission as colonel of a regiment raised by the Duke of Rutland to assist in quelling the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. This corps never got beyond Newcastle, but young Granby went to the front as a volunteer on the Duke of Cumberland's staff, and saw active service in the last stages of the insurrection. Soon afterwards his regiment was disbanded, but he retained his rank and campaigned in Flanders in 1747.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Granby Street Granby Street was named after the Marquess of Granby. In 1703, the ninth Earl of Rutland was created Duke of Rutland and Marquess of Granby by Queen Anne. The most memorable Marquess of Granby was John Manners (1721–1770) who was the son of the third Duke. He was accomplished soldier and popular figure of his time. As with a number of prominent military leaders his title was honoured by being used by a large number of pubs throughout Britain. The towns of Granby, Quebec and Granby, Massachusetts, United States were also named after him. Lieutenant-General John Manners he did not outlive his father and was known by his father's subsidiary title, Marquess of Granby. He served in the Seven Years' War as overall commander of the British troops on the battlefield and was subsequently rewarded with the post of Commander-in-Chief of the Forces. He was returned as Member of Parliament for the family borough of Grantham in 1741. In 1745 he received a commission as colonel of a regiment raised by the Duke of Rutland to assist in quelling the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745. This corps never got beyond Newcastle, but young Granby went to the front as a volunteer on the Duke of Cumberland's staff, and saw active service in the last stages of the insurrection. Soon afterwards his regiment was disbanded, but he retained his rank and campaigned in Flanders in 1747.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.