Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
High Street In towns the name High Street was traditionally used to indicate the primary business street. High Street is the most common street name in the UK, which according to a 2009 statistical compilation has 5,410 High Streets, 3,811 Station Roads and 2,702 Main Streets. By the Middle English the word ‘high’ denoted a metaphorical meaning of excellence or superior rank (Lord High Chancellor or high society). ‘High’ also applied to roads as they improved: ‘highway’ was a new term taken up by the church and their vestries to during the 17th century as a term for all public roads between settlements. ‘High Street’ was gradually adopted to describe thoroughfares with significant retail in large villages and towns. Since the 19th century which saw the building of more public roads (public highways), in countries using the term motorway, the term highway fell out of common speech as it became more specific to its legal definition, denoting any public road, as in the Highway Code.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
High Street In towns the name High Street was traditionally used to indicate the primary business street. High Street is the most common street name in the UK, which according to a 2009 statistical compilation has 5,410 High Streets, 3,811 Station Roads and 2,702 Main Streets. By the Middle English the word ‘high’ denoted a metaphorical meaning of excellence or superior rank (Lord High Chancellor or high society). ‘High’ also applied to roads as they improved: ‘highway’ was a new term taken up by the church and their vestries to during the 17th century as a term for all public roads between settlements. ‘High Street’ was gradually adopted to describe thoroughfares with significant retail in large villages and towns. Since the 19th century which saw the building of more public roads (public highways), in countries using the term motorway, the term highway fell out of common speech as it became more specific to its legal definition, denoting any public road, as in the Highway Code.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.