Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Leicester Road Leicester Road runs into the middle of Loughborough. Part of the road in Southfields ward is part of the Leicester Road Conservation Area. According to the March 2006 appraisal: Leicester Road was developed in the Georgian and early Victorian period as the town began to grow. The development is shown on a map of 1837. Three storey town houses were built along the road. Nos 16 - 36, were built to the edge of the highway. Nos 16 & 18 have been demolished to make way for the highway improvement. Nos 38 - 68 were built to a slightly lesser scale but still three storey with small walled front gardens. Nos 46 - 56 were replaced by a petrol station. Beyond the conservation area to the east there was a thriving hosiery industry and within the conservation area there was an important buckle factory. No 38 Leicester Road, known as Lantern House, was the home of John Heathcoat who invented significant improvements to hosiery and lace making. In partnership with Charles Lacy, he set up a factory in Loughborough. The factory was attacked by Luddites in 1816 and 55 frames were destroyed. Heathcoat moved the business to Tiverton in Devon, where it still flourishes. Besides the town houses, housing was built for workers behind the main road along Factory Street, Gregory Street and King Street. There was a gap in the row for the garden of Burton House, owned by Mr Gregory and since demolished, hence Gregory Street. As the town’s population grew in the later 19th Century there was also a need for more places of worship. No 68a was built as the vicarage for Holy Trinity Church in 1878. In the 1960s the textile and hosiery industry was at its peak in the town and many people came to work in the factories from India and East Pakistan, now Bangladesh. Many of them found accommodation and still live in the area behind the conservation area. In the 1990s the industry declined to extinction. The Buckle Factory on King Street has recently been replaced by a block of flats. Leicester Road maintains its role as a principal way into the town. In the 1930s it was classified as the trunk road from London to Inverness as part of a neat and tidy scheme for numbering the roads in the country. Today it is well used by local traffic and some heavy goods even though the M1 has been the main traffic route for several decades and the Epinal Way provides a partial by-pass for the town. The importance of Leicester Road as a highway mean that the traffic, the traffic lights, the white lines and the signposts dominate the area. Nevertheless, there are quieter periods out of rush hours when the traffic is fairly light.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Leicester Road Leicester Road runs into the middle of Loughborough. Part of the road in Southfields ward is part of the Leicester Road Conservation Area. According to the March 2006 appraisal: Leicester Road was developed in the Georgian and early Victorian period as the town began to grow. The development is shown on a map of 1837. Three storey town houses were built along the road. Nos 16 - 36, were built to the edge of the highway. Nos 16 & 18 have been demolished to make way for the highway improvement. Nos 38 - 68 were built to a slightly lesser scale but still three storey with small walled front gardens. Nos 46 - 56 were replaced by a petrol station. Beyond the conservation area to the east there was a thriving hosiery industry and within the conservation area there was an important buckle factory. No 38 Leicester Road, known as Lantern House, was the home of John Heathcoat who invented significant improvements to hosiery and lace making. In partnership with Charles Lacy, he set up a factory in Loughborough. The factory was attacked by Luddites in 1816 and 55 frames were destroyed. Heathcoat moved the business to Tiverton in Devon, where it still flourishes. Besides the town houses, housing was built for workers behind the main road along Factory Street, Gregory Street and King Street. There was a gap in the row for the garden of Burton House, owned by Mr Gregory and since demolished, hence Gregory Street. As the town’s population grew in the later 19th Century there was also a need for more places of worship. No 68a was built as the vicarage for Holy Trinity Church in 1878. In the 1960s the textile and hosiery industry was at its peak in the town and many people came to work in the factories from India and East Pakistan, now Bangladesh. Many of them found accommodation and still live in the area behind the conservation area. In the 1990s the industry declined to extinction. The Buckle Factory on King Street has recently been replaced by a block of flats. Leicester Road maintains its role as a principal way into the town. In the 1930s it was classified as the trunk road from London to Inverness as part of a neat and tidy scheme for numbering the roads in the country. Today it is well used by local traffic and some heavy goods even though the M1 has been the main traffic route for several decades and the Epinal Way provides a partial by-pass for the town. The importance of Leicester Road as a highway mean that the traffic, the traffic lights, the white lines and the signposts dominate the area. Nevertheless, there are quieter periods out of rush hours when the traffic is fairly light.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.