Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Market Place Loughborough Market is held every Thursday and Saturday. The charter was granted by King Henry III in 1221. Another Charter in 1226 gave permission for the annual November fair when the town centre becomes a riot of bright lights, screams and music. The Charter is read out every year by the Mayor from the balcony of the Town Hall to open the fair. In the centre of the Market Place is a drinking fountain presented by Archdeacon Fearon in 1870 to commemorate the town's first clean water supply. Around the fountain are some brass plaques to honour our four twin towns of Epinal in France, Schwabisch Hall in Germany, Bhavnagar in India and Gembloux in Belgium. During a Parliamentary contest in 1857 the three candidates addressed a crowd from the hustings in the Market Place. One of the speakers had aroused the audience to angry outbursts and the situation became so serious that the Riot Act was read by magistrate from the Town Hall steps. Immediately after this force of police emerged from the adjoining passage and charged the crowd, using their batons freely, later the same day the Windows of the Bull’s Head were smashed.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
Market Place Loughborough Market is held every Thursday and Saturday. The charter was granted by King Henry III in 1221. Another Charter in 1226 gave permission for the annual November fair when the town centre becomes a riot of bright lights, screams and music. The Charter is read out every year by the Mayor from the balcony of the Town Hall to open the fair. In the centre of the Market Place is a drinking fountain presented by Archdeacon Fearon in 1870 to commemorate the town's first clean water supply. Around the fountain are some brass plaques to honour our four twin towns of Epinal in France, Schwabisch Hall in Germany, Bhavnagar in India and Gembloux in Belgium. During a Parliamentary contest in 1857 the three candidates addressed a crowd from the hustings in the Market Place. One of the speakers had aroused the audience to angry outbursts and the situation became so serious that the Riot Act was read by magistrate from the Town Hall steps. Immediately after this force of police emerged from the adjoining passage and charged the crowd, using their batons freely, later the same day the Windows of the Bull’s Head were smashed.
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.