Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Miah slams Labour for selecting Stuart Brady Local Labour group leader Jewel Miah has criticised his own Constituency Labour Party in a national publication for selecting Stuart Brady as its candidate as it emerges that only six ethnic minority candidates have been selected by Labour across 99 target seats. Miah told the New Statesman that he was “very disappointed” with his local party’s decision. “They looked at the demographics of Loughborough and made their decision accordingly, choosing a privately educated barrister from Nottinghamshire despite the fact I was the homegrown candidate,” he said. “The party should be concerned about the lack of diversity of their candidates, yet they’re not doing anything to improve it nationally.” In 2015 Labour made a catastrophic mistake of selecting Matthew O’Callaghan from Melton as their candidate and, after a weak campaign, the Labour vote went down by 2.6%. In 2017, with Miah as the candidate, the Labour vote went up 10.1% taking him within 4,269 votes of Nicky Morgan. By now the Green, UKIP and Liberal Democrat votes had been so tightly squeezed the only way in which a candidate could increase the Labour support any further was to start targeting the Conservative vote as support for Nicky remained virtually the same at about 50%. Although Miah’s bitterness over his failure to get selected may be understandable, it is difficult to see how he could have boosted the Labour vote any further. It was not simply a matter of being the wrong colour, as he is implying, nor that his performance as Labour group leader is at best lacklustre, which prevented him from being selected again. Miah went out of his way to oppose Corbyn’s leadership campaign in 2015, not only by backing Yvette Cooper (alongside Southfields candidate Arthur Gould) but he allowed the former MP Andy Reed to serve as his election agent in 2017. At the start of the campaign, Reed wrote: “Over the last couple of years, I think it has been pretty obvious that I think Corbyn has been an electoral problem for Labour. Nothing I have heard from hundreds of people locally (and wherever I go in the country) who have always voted Labour and now despair at what to do makes me change my view on our leadership. However, in Jewel Miah we have a candidate who we can support locally to be a good championing MP if he gets elected.” Miah is, of course, correct in agreeing that the Labour Party is doing little to address the diversity of its marginal candidates and appears to believe that the way to achieve electoral victory is through the selection of white, middle-class candidates in its marginal seats. But alinging himself to an arch critic of Corbyn in a constituency which voted to back Corbyn was probably his biggest mistake.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Miah slams Labour for selecting Stuart Brady Local Labour group leader Jewel Miah has criticised his own Constituency Labour Party in a national publication for selecting Stuart Brady as its candidate as it emerges that only six ethnic minority candidates have been selected by Labour across 99 target seats. Miah told the New Statesman that he was “very disappointed” with his local party’s decision. “They looked at the demographics of Loughborough and made their decision accordingly, choosing a privately educated barrister from Nottinghamshire despite the fact I was the homegrown candidate,” he said. “The party should be concerned about the lack of diversity of their candidates, yet they’re not doing anything to improve it nationally.” In 2015 Labour made a catastrophic mistake of selecting Matthew O’Callaghan from Melton as their candidate and, after a weak campaign, the Labour vote went down by 2.6%. In 2017, with Miah as the candidate, the Labour vote went up 10.1% taking him within 4,269 votes of Nicky Morgan. By now the Green, UKIP and Liberal Democrat votes had been so tightly squeezed the only way in which a candidate could increase the Labour support any further was to start targeting the Conservative vote as support for Nicky remained virtually the same at about 50%. Although Miah’s bitterness over his failure to get selected may be understandable, it is difficult to see how he could have boosted the Labour vote any further. It was not simply a matter of being the wrong colour, as he is implying, nor that his performance as Labour group leader is at best lacklustre, which prevented him from being selected again. Miah went out of his way to oppose Corbyn’s leadership campaign in 2015, not only by backing Yvette Cooper (alongside Southfields candidate Arthur Gould) but he allowed the former MP Andy Reed to serve as his election agent in 2017. At the start of the campaign, Reed wrote: “Over the last couple of years, I think it has been pretty obvious that I think Corbyn has been an electoral problem for Labour. Nothing I have heard from hundreds of people locally (and wherever I go in the country) who have always voted Labour and now despair at what to do makes me change my view on our leadership. However, in Jewel Miah we have a candidate who we can support locally to be a good championing MP if he gets elected.” Miah is, of course, correct in agreeing that the Labour Party is doing little to address the diversity of its marginal candidates and appears to believe that the way to achieve electoral victory is through the selection of white, middle-class candidates in its marginal seats. But alinging himself to an arch critic of Corbyn in a constituency which voted to back Corbyn was probably his biggest mistake.