Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
The Rushes Loughborough has existed as a settlement for at least 2,000 years and the name The Rushes comes from rushes that originally grew in this area. There are two causeways across the Soar meadows to the NorthEast carrying the roads to Normanton and Cotes Mill and hence to Nottingham and to the SouthWest of the Church the town extended down the hill to a crossing point of the Woodbrook from where there were roads going up to Ashby and Derby. The Woodbrook, not the Soar which is nearly a mile away, is the waterway on whose banks Loughborough stands but today this trickle of a stream is barely visible. In Victorian times, J Deakin, founder of the local newspaper, described The Rushes as an “insalubrious quarter” about which “police records tell of constant rows, of the un-wisdom of a single policeman patrolling there on Saturday nights, of the occasional use of the truncheon with the consequent broken heads, and of drunken men and virago women being taken to the police station in a wheelbarrow”. There were a number of lodging houses in the immediate area where “money was spent on sensual gratification” and “males and females crowd into the night rooms, where they sleep indiscriminately”.  
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
The Rushes Loughborough has existed as a settlement for at least 2,000 years and the name The Rushes comes from rushes that originally grew in this area. There are two causeways across the Soar meadows to the NorthEast carrying the roads to Normanton and Cotes Mill and hence to Nottingham and to the SouthWest of the Church the town extended down the hill to a crossing point of the Woodbrook from where there were roads going up to Ashby and Derby. The Woodbrook, not the Soar which is nearly a mile away, is the waterway on whose banks Loughborough stands but today this trickle of a stream is barely visible. In Victorian times, J Deakin, founder of the local newspaper, described The Rushes as an “insalubrious quarter” about which “police records tell of constant rows, of the un-wisdom of a single policeman patrolling there on Saturday nights, of the occasional use of the truncheon with the consequent broken heads, and of drunken men and virago women being taken to the police station in a wheelbarrow”. There were a number of lodging houses in the immediate area where “money was spent on sensual gratification” and “males and females crowd into the night rooms, where they sleep indiscriminately”.  
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.