Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Supporting students in Southfields ward Students form a significant minority in Southfields ward and constitute about 31% of its electorate. For some residents their presence is not welcome. Labour’s candidate in the elections on 2 May, Arthur Gould, has denounced them as “upmarket kids”. In response, local Southfields councillor Paul Mercer suggested that this was an unfair description given that they come from a broad social spectrum and whether they own a car does not necessarily indicate whether they are ‘upmarket’ – by which one assumes Gould means coming from a wealthier background. The relationship between students and local residents is not always harmonious and Paul and fellow Southfields councillor Ted Parton have put a lot of effort into introducing measures to reduce friction. The five main policies are: 1. Restricting HMOs Paul and Ted have fought hard to oppose new HMOs (houses in multiple occupation) and over the past four years have achieved a number of significant successes. “Although the vast majority of students are quiet and respectful, it is a small minority that are responsible for disrupting the lives of their neighbours and making noise as they make their way through the ward”, commented Ted. 2. HMO licensing One of the successes that Paul and Ted have achieved over the past four years is to successfully argue the case to introduce licensing of HMOs. This will be introduced by the controlling Conservative group on Charnwood Borough Council after the May elections following a statutory consultation period. 3. Street marshals Paul and Ted have campaigned hard for street marshals. The idea is that the University would help fund a professional team of street marshals to ensure that noise and disturbance late at night is kept to a minimum. “The University has chosen not to accommodate a large proportion of its students on its campus and has instead concentrated on building new facilities and inviting outside companies to operate there,” observed Ted. “These types of development are of course welcome if they bring wealth into the town but they should not undermine the community.” The Labour Party has consistently opposed street marshals. 4. Annual cleanup Paul and Ted have ensured that changes were made to the annual rubbish cleanup whereby students are offered the opportunity to get rid of any excess rubbish at the end of the academic year. As a result of changes, which they proposed and which have now been implemented, the number of complaints from local residents at the end of the student year has dropped to zero. 5. Campus liaison committee Paul and Ted regularly attend meetings of the joint campus liaison committee to which all Loughborough councillors are invited. Meetings often take place with little or no representation from Labour borough councillors who seem disinterested in using it as a platform to listen to and represent the concerns of residents to the University and students. Meeting students Over the next few weeks, in the run-up to the local elections, Paul and Ted intend to visit as many students as possible to ensure that they come out and vote to support their efforts to represent their interests and reduce friction with residents. “Gould’s comment is not going down well on the doorstep”, remarked Ted, “and I imagine that this will be reflected in the ballot box”.
Published and promoted by Paul Mercer, 58A Wards End, Loughborough LE11 3HB
This site only uses cookies in order to collect anonymous usage data for Google Analytics and StatCounter. By using this site we assume that you are happy to receive cookies.
Supporting students in Southfields ward Students form a significant minority in Southfields ward and constitute about 31% of its electorate. For some residents their presence is not welcome. Labour’s candidate in the elections on 2 May, Arthur Gould, has denounced them as “upmarket kids”. In response, local Southfields councillor Paul Mercer suggested that this was an unfair description given that they come from a broad social spectrum and whether they own a car does not necessarily indicate whether they are ‘upmarket’ – by which one assumes Gould means coming from a wealthier background. The relationship between students and local residents is not always harmonious and Paul and fellow Southfields councillor Ted Parton have put a lot of effort into introducing measures to reduce friction. The five main policies are: 1. Restricting HMOs Paul and Ted have fought hard to oppose new HMOs (houses in multiple occupation) and over the past four years have achieved a number of significant successes. “Although the vast majority of students are quiet and respectful, it is a small minority that are responsible for disrupting the lives of their neighbours and making noise as they make their way through the ward”, commented Ted. 2. HMO licensing One of the successes that Paul and Ted have achieved over the past four years is to successfully argue the case to introduce licensing of HMOs. This will be introduced by the controlling Conservative group on Charnwood Borough Council after the May elections following a statutory consultation period. 3. Street marshals Paul and Ted have campaigned hard for street marshals. The idea is that the University would help fund a professional team of street marshals to ensure that noise and disturbance late at night is kept to a minimum. “The University has chosen not to accommodate a large proportion of its students on its campus and has instead concentrated on building new facilities and inviting outside companies to operate there,” observed Ted. “These types of development are of course welcome if they bring wealth into the town but they should not undermine the community.” The Labour Party has consistently opposed street marshals. 4. Annual cleanup Paul and Ted have ensured that changes were made to the annual rubbish cleanup whereby students are offered the opportunity to get rid of any excess rubbish at the end of the academic year. As a result of changes, which they proposed and which have now been implemented, the number of complaints from local residents at the end of the student year has dropped to zero. 5. Campus liaison committee Paul and Ted regularly attend meetings of the joint campus liaison committee to which all Loughborough councillors are invited. Meetings often take place with little or no representation from Labour borough councillors who seem disinterested in using it as a platform to listen to and represent the concerns of residents to the University and students. Meeting students Over the next few weeks, in the run-up to the local elections, Paul and Ted intend to visit as many students as possible to ensure that they come out and vote to support their efforts to represent their interests and reduce friction with residents. “Gould’s comment is not going down well on the doorstep”, remarked Ted, “and I imagine that this will be reflected in the ballot box”.